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Christmas is one of the most anticipated holidays of the whole year, if not the most. Every country has its own traditions regarding this holiday, which in many cases do not differ much. In the following article, however, we would like to present you the characteristic Christmas traditions of the USA and Great Britain. Enjoy!

UNITED KINGDOM

1. Letters to Father Christmas

While in other countries children put their letters in the mailbox, in England, they toss them straight into fire. Prima facie it sounds kind of drastically, but don’t worry, burning the letters sends them directly to the North Pole where Santa can read the wishes in the smoke.😉

2. Hanging stockings

Brits usually hang stockings around their beds, contrary to Americans, who hang them by the fireplace. I mean, being surrounded by presents is a brilliant way to start a new day! On the other hand, letting Santa – a complete stranger, to get this close to your sleeping body is a little worrying, but to each his own I guess.

Another interesting tradition – in the UK people leave brandy and a mince pie for Father Christmas, instead of milk and cookies. He is a grown up, remember?

3. Christmas crackers

As you may know, a Christmas cracker is a brightly decorated cardboard tube that typically contain a paper crown (tissue party hat), a motto (joke or riddle), a snap (friction activated popping device), and a small gift or novelty item. When grabbed and pulled apart, a tiny explosive inside makes a loud cracking noise, hence the name.

4. Christmas hats

Inside the Christmas cracker are colourful hats that it is absolutely mandatory to wear. In fact, 90% of Christmas arguments stem from trying to make your grumpiest relative put their paper crown on. Some say that the other 10% comes from playing Monopoly, which may also be seen as a tradition 😀

5. Christmas dinner

Imagine a huge feast where everything is either roasted, soaked in alcohol or lit on fire. Yep, that’s a British Christmas dinner. The main dish is usually a roast turkey often surrounded by bacon wrapped chipolatas (which are mini pork sausages). The turkey is served with roast potatoes and vegetables – mostly brussels sprouts. They also have gravy to smother everything in and a bread sauce (a sauce thickened by bread – looks a little lumpy, but is actually delicious).

6. Christmas pudding

Christmas pudding is a traditional British dessert that is a very dense boiled cake flavoured with dried fruit and spices. It’s then soaked in alcohol, aged for several months, boiled again, soaked in alcohol again and then soaked on fire 😊.

7. Also, side note on Scottish traditions –

The Christmas pudding is called a “ClottieDumplin” in some parts of the country. 

Because it’s a dumpling (fruit cake) that was traditionally boiled in a rag, or a clottie. Originally these were two different deserts, made in different ways, but in some places the name stuck while the desert itself changed slightly.

8. The Royal Christmas Message

Every Christmas Day, her Majesty the Queen gives a holiday speech reflecting on the eventing of past year. In every family people gather around the tv and listen to it, or just pretend they do while doing other stuff 😉.

9. Boxing day

Christmas in the UK starts on the 25th of December. Although for lots of Brits Boxing day, which is one day after, is more important. It’s origins are debatable. Some say that it’s the day when workers would receive a box of gifts from their bosses, others say that it’s a day when people would box up gifts for the poor. However, the main things that happens on Boxing day nowadays is shopping. Boxing Day sales are common and shops often allow dramatic price reductions. For many merchants, Boxing Day has become the day of the year with the greatest revenue.

10. Pantomime

Every year around the Christmas halls, pretty much every theatre in the country puts on a pantomime. These are plays for kids based on fairy tales such as Cinderella or Aladdin, involving a lot of high-camp, cross-dressing and audience interaction.

11. Taking down the Christmas tree

Brits believe that the Christmas tree and decorations should be taken down withing 12 days after Christmas, otherwise you’ll have bad luck for the rest of the year.

UNITED STATES

Christmas is awaited not only by the youngest. The best example of this is the American society, which begins great preparations for Christmas just after Thanksgiving Day. Shops and city streets are quickly decorated, and the Americans themselves are engulfed in a pre-Christmas race. A big difference in relation to the holidays in the Polish edition is also when they are and how much actually Christmas lasts in the USA.

For Americans, Christmas Eve is not so important. The most important day of the holiday is December 25, when you sit down to eat together and unpack gifts. There is not much time to enjoy the company of loved ones, because the second day of Christmas is not recognized in the USA – December 26 is a normal working day.

Another important difference is the multitude of traditions and customs. It could not be otherwise, after all, the United States itself is extremely diverse in terms of culture. Therefore, it should come as no surprise that next to snowmen, Christmas trees and Santa Clauses, in shops you can also find decorations for the Jewish holiday of Hannukah.

Christmas Eve and Christmas traditions in the USA are probably known to many from their Christmas films, in which decorations are in the foreground. Of course, a Christmas tree and decorating houses with Christmas lights are obligatory. On Christmas Eve, children leave cookies and glass of milk in a visible place for Santa to enjoy unwrapping gifts on Christmas morning.

It is extremely popular to send Christmas cards (similar to the UK) and to feast with family and friends. Christmas in America also has its original tradition, which is Elf on the shelf. This custom is maintained by parents who want to motivate their children to behave in a polite way. Shortly after Thanksgiving, they set up a figurine / puppet / mascot of an elf, who, as Santa’s helper, is tasked with checking that the children are not mischievous. The elf is rearranged when the children are asleep and one of the basic rules is that it cannot be touched by them. On Christmas Eve, the Elf disappears – he returns to Santa to report to him whether the child was a bully or was behaving in an exemplary manner (naughty or nice)

The menu for Christmas dinner is very similar to that of Thanksgiving. The reigns are turkey, cranberry sauce and mashed potatoes (preferably sweet). Roast ham with gravy sauce is served very often. Desserts include pudding, egg nog and cake – usually a pumpkin pie. As in other countries, gingerbreads and mulled wine are popular.

Merry Christmas Everyone!

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CHRISTMAS in UK & USA

Christmas is one of the most anticipated holidays of the whole year, if not the most. Every country has its own traditions regarding this holiday, which in many cases do not differ much. In the following article, however, we would like to present you the characteristic Christmas traditions of the USA and Great Britain. Enjoy!

UNITED KINGDOM

1. Letters to Father Christmas

While in other countries children put their letters in the mailbox, in England, they toss them straight into fire. Prima facie it sounds kind of drastically, but don’t worry, burning the letters sends them directly to the North Pole where Santa can read the wishes in the smoke.😉

2. Hanging stockings

Brits usually hang stockings around their beds, contrary to Americans, who hang them by the fireplace. I mean, being surrounded by presents is a brilliant way to start a new day! On the other hand, letting Santa – a complete stranger, to get this close to your sleeping body is a little worrying, but to each his own I guess.

Another interesting tradition – in the UK people leave brandy and a mince pie for Father Christmas, instead of milk and cookies. He is a grown up, remember?

3. Christmas crackers

As you may know, a Christmas cracker is a brightly decorated cardboard tube that typically contain a paper crown (tissue party hat), a motto (joke or riddle), a snap (friction activated popping device), and a small gift or novelty item. When grabbed and pulled apart, a tiny explosive inside makes a loud cracking noise, hence the name.

4. Christmas hats

Inside the Christmas cracker are colourful hats that it is absolutely mandatory to wear. In fact, 90% of Christmas arguments stem from trying to make your grumpiest relative put their paper crown on. Some say that the other 10% comes from playing Monopoly, which may also be seen as a tradition 😀

5. Christmas dinner

Imagine a huge feast where everything is either roasted, soaked in alcohol or lit on fire. Yep, that’s a British Christmas dinner. The main dish is usually a roast turkey often surrounded by bacon wrapped chipolatas (which are mini pork sausages). The turkey is served with roast potatoes and vegetables – mostly brussels sprouts. They also have gravy to smother everything in and a bread sauce (a sauce thickened by bread – looks a little lumpy, but is actually delicious).

6. Christmas pudding

Christmas pudding is a traditional British dessert that is a very dense boiled cake flavoured with dried fruit and spices. It’s then soaked in alcohol, aged for several months, boiled again, soaked in alcohol again and then soaked on fire 😊.

7. Also, side note on Scottish traditions –

The Christmas pudding is called a “ClottieDumplin” in some parts of the country. 

Because it’s a dumpling (fruit cake) that was traditionally boiled in a rag, or a clottie. Originally these were two different deserts, made in different ways, but in some places the name stuck while the desert itself changed slightly.

8. The Royal Christmas Message

Every Christmas Day, her Majesty the Queen gives a holiday speech reflecting on the eventing of past year. In every family people gather around the tv and listen to it, or just pretend they do while doing other stuff 😉.

9. Boxing day

Christmas in the UK starts on the 25th of December. Although for lots of Brits Boxing day, which is one day after, is more important. It’s origins are debatable. Some say that it’s the day when workers would receive a box of gifts from their bosses, others say that it’s a day when people would box up gifts for the poor. However, the main things that happens on Boxing day nowadays is shopping. Boxing Day sales are common and shops often allow dramatic price reductions. For many merchants, Boxing Day has become the day of the year with the greatest revenue.

10. Pantomime

Every year around the Christmas halls, pretty much every theatre in the country puts on a pantomime. These are plays for kids based on fairy tales such as Cinderella or Aladdin, involving a lot of high-camp, cross-dressing and audience interaction.

11. Taking down the Christmas tree

Brits believe that the Christmas tree and decorations should be taken down withing 12 days after Christmas, otherwise you’ll have bad luck for the rest of the year.

UNITED STATES

Christmas is awaited not only by the youngest. The best example of this is the American society, which begins great preparations for Christmas just after Thanksgiving Day. Shops and city streets are quickly decorated, and the Americans themselves are engulfed in a pre-Christmas race. A big difference in relation to the holidays in the Polish edition is also when they are and how much actually Christmas lasts in the USA.

For Americans, Christmas Eve is not so important. The most important day of the holiday is December 25, when you sit down to eat together and unpack gifts. There is not much time to enjoy the company of loved ones, because the second day of Christmas is not recognized in the USA – December 26 is a normal working day.

Another important difference is the multitude of traditions and customs. It could not be otherwise, after all, the United States itself is extremely diverse in terms of culture. Therefore, it should come as no surprise that next to snowmen, Christmas trees and Santa Clauses, in shops you can also find decorations for the Jewish holiday of Hannukah.

Christmas Eve and Christmas traditions in the USA are probably known to many from their Christmas films, in which decorations are in the foreground. Of course, a Christmas tree and decorating houses with Christmas lights are obligatory. On Christmas Eve, children leave cookies and glass of milk in a visible place for Santa to enjoy unwrapping gifts on Christmas morning.

It is extremely popular to send Christmas cards (similar to the UK) and to feast with family and friends. Christmas in America also has its original tradition, which is Elf on the shelf. This custom is maintained by parents who want to motivate their children to behave in a polite way. Shortly after Thanksgiving, they set up a figurine / puppet / mascot of an elf, who, as Santa’s helper, is tasked with checking that the children are not mischievous. The elf is rearranged when the children are asleep and one of the basic rules is that it cannot be touched by them. On Christmas Eve, the Elf disappears – he returns to Santa to report to him whether the child was a bully or was behaving in an exemplary manner (naughty or nice)

The menu for Christmas dinner is very similar to that of Thanksgiving. The reigns are turkey, cranberry sauce and mashed potatoes (preferably sweet). Roast ham with gravy sauce is served very often. Desserts include pudding, egg nog and cake – usually a pumpkin pie. As in other countries, gingerbreads and mulled wine are popular.

Merry Christmas Everyone!

Sources:https://angloville.pl/artykuly/swieta-bozego-narodzenia-w-usa-jak-je-obchodza-amerykanie/embed/#?secret=dTK7Xy9LRGhttps://angloville.pl/artykuly/swieta-bozego-narodzenia-wielkiej-brytanii/embed/#?secret=FH81sKRmwK

https://www.whychristmas.com/cultures/uk.shtml

News prepered by Natalia Ślusarczyk and Roksana Ręczmin from class 3f.

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Sources:

https://www.whychristmas.com/cultures/uk.shtml

News prepered by Natalia Ślusarczyk and Roksana Ręczmin from class 3f.


A few days ago students from classes 3F and 3B had the pleasure to take part in a very unique project callled “Meet America” which is the effect of cooperation between US Ambasy and American Centre Cracow. The students had a chance to talk with US Consul – Mrs. Dolores Prin. Mrs Janina Galas was representing American Corner Cracow and she was the one to open the meeting which took place on the Zoom plarform. Pupils could listen to a brief introduction from the lecturer. Mrs. Prin told about her way to the place where she is now. She also proved on her example that anyone could become a diplomat. The whole story was inspiring, but amusing too. After that part Mrs. Dolores moved to answering inquiries. The whole group had the opportunity to ask our guest at least one question. Students learned a lot about life in America , including stereotypes, culture, climate, education as well as similarities and differences between Americans and Poles. Mrs Consul described willingly her work as a diplomat and many other topics. Mrs. Prin was open on taking on any subject and we can honestly say she established some kind of relationship with students. When it was time to end the meeting, everyone said goodbye and left satisfied and with a dose of new knowledge. It was definitely a good experience for all the students from our high school. Everyone will remember this meeting for a long time.

News written by Ewa Ziętek from 3f, edited by Ms Marzena Kossak-Wąchała.


In Britain, Christmas Eve begins at noon. Lunch consists of roast turkey and pudding. On Christmas Eve, English children hang their Christmas stockings outside the door to find gifts the next morning.
In Spain, the Christmas Eve supper begins after Midnight Mass. Then everyone goes out to the streets lit by thousands of colored light bulbs, singing Christmas carols, dancing and having fun until morning. The main course is baked fish and “Epiphany cake”, in which small gifts are baked.
In France, holidays are spent with the family. The French give each other handmade Christmas cards and buy gifts. In France, unlike in Poland, there is no Christmas Eve. The French attend mass, and on December 25 they sit down to dinner together. On this day, you eat turkey stuffed with chestnuts and drink lots of champagne.
In Greece, the day before Christmas, you can meet carolers walking around the houses. You can find “Christopsomo” on almost every table. It is a round loaf decorated with a cross at the top, around which people put dough symbols representing everything that signifies durability. If the revelers come from the island and are fishermen, you will see bread with fish on their table. Christmas trees are not widely used in Greece and gifts are given on January 1st.
In Denmark, the Christmas Eve dish is sweet rice with cinnamon and roasted goose with apples. A traditional dish is a rice pudding in which the hostess hides an almond. Whoever finds it gets marzipan mump, which ensures happiness all year round.

news prepared by Dominika Kasprzyk from 1 F, edited by Ms J. Wołkowicka

Photos from Pinterest


On Saturday, November 6, our group went for a trip to Wisła. During the trip we saw Adam Małysz’s hill and a lot of interesting places. Our challenge was climbing route: Kubalonka Pass – Mraźnica – Kiczory – SKKT Stożek hostel – Wisła Jurzyków. When we arrived at our destination, we had to go by bus up to 550 meters above sea level, then we had to climb. For two hours we could watch beautiful views and the mountains. The weather was very sunny so could observe nature. Later on, we got to Stożek hostel. There we could eat and drink something warm. When everybody took some rest, we could make our way back to coach, that was another hour walking. We sang, talked, took pictures of the views, got to know a few people from a different class who had been with us on the trip. The trip lasted until 8 pm. Fresh air and mountain climate ensured our relax. We recommend everyone to travel, because you can spend an active day. During this trip we had possibilities to spent very nice and interesting time.

The last trip this year was on the 27th of November to Salmopolska Pass– Kotarz – Karkoszczonka Pass– Szczyrk Biła. As always we departed at 7.30 a.m. On the spot we went along snowy trails, there were beautiful, winter views. We were throwing snowballs at each other and we were delighted with winter atmosphere. When we came to the hostel, unfortunately it was closed, but we stayed in good moods. Home-made sandwiches and hot tea were all we needed. Later we continued our walking. Quite fast we arrived at Szczyrk Biła and we came back home by our bus. It was a very different trip because of the snow but it was great fun.

We would like to thank all our companions for the time spent together and are looking forward to seeing everyone back on trail in the following season!

news prepared by Julia Caban and Maja Deska from 1 F, edited by Ms J. Wołkowicka

photos by Dominika Kasprzyk, Oliwier Erling from 1 F, Cezary Kołodziejczyk from 3 J, Ms Roma Ociepa, Ms Joanna Wołkowicka